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University Pathways
Advanced Level Foundation

Key information

Start dates:
11 September 2017; 8 January 2018
Course length:
1 Academic Year (3 terms). An Extended Foundation of 4–7 terms is also available.
Class size range:
8–12
Tuition:
Average 21 hours per week (plus homework and private study)

Entry requirements

Academic:
Completion of 11–12 years of schooling with documented proof of very good results. Specific entry criteria may be required for mathematics and engineering pathways.
English:
IELTS 5.5 or equivalent (5.0 in Reading and Writing)
Minimum age:
17

Advanced Level Foundation pathways

Pathways to university from the Advanced Level Foundation at Kings

 

Degree pathways from the Advanced Level Foundation at Kings

possible pathways to degrees from the Advanced level Foundation at Kings

The course

The Advanced Level Foundation is based on the A-level syllabuses, taught by A-level teachers, assessed against A-levels and moderated by an independent Advisory Board of external examiners. As such, it is one of the most highly academic and successful pathways to the UK's leading universities.

For students with appropriate IELTS and academic levels, the Advanced Level Foundation can be followed as a standalone three-term accelerated course.

We build a good degree of flexibility into our programmes so that we can accommodate each of our student's needs and better help them achieve their goals.

Within each of our six subject pathways of the Advanced Level Foundation, the student is guided to choose the best modules for the degree they aim to study at university. The table below shows some of the combinations and outcomes.

Recognised by widest choice of quality universities

Kings does not work with a narrow range of university partners. This is because our Advanced Level Foundation is based on, and linked to, A-levels. It is therefore automatically recognised and accepted by the widest choice of universities. Out of the top 25 universities listed in the Times and Sunday Times 2015 rankings, 20 have accepted Kings’ Foundation students.

Benchmarking against A-level grades

Offers to Kings Foundation students from the top 30 universities are typically based on their normal A-level offers.

This means that if, for example, a university’s standard A-level offer for a given course is ABB, a Kings Foundation student who has an offer from that university would typically need to achieve a pass rate of 65% on the Kings Advanced Level Foundation in order to take up their university place. 

A Kings student who achieves 75% on the Advanced Level Foundation is therefore the kind of student who could be expected to achieve three As if they were following an A-level course.  

Typical A-level offer Typical Kings Foundation offer
A*A*A* 80%
AAA 75%
AAB 70%
ABB 65%
BBB 60%
CCC 50%

 

Pearson assured

The Kings Advanced Level Foundation is inspected by Pearson and assured as preparation for Higher Education study in the UK.

Pearson is the UK's largest awarding organisation, offering academic and vocational qualifications and testing to schools, colleges, employers and other places of learning in the UK and internationally. 

Pearson assures the quality of the processes underpinning the design, delivery, quality assurance and/or assessment of the organisation's own education or training programme. Pearson do not assure specific qualifications or programmes offered by Kings.

Pearson logo

Assessment

Assessment is integral to the course. You will write five challenging coursework assignments and take five exams per semester.

Exams are set and marked by Kings teachers but the standards are set by the Independent Advisory Board. This ensures the system is completely fair and the course maintains consistently high standards year after year.

After each exam your teachers will review your progress with you so that you learn your strengths and weaknesses and improve your performance in the next assessment.

Your final award is based equally on marks gained for coursework assignments and examinations in each subject over both semesters. 

On successfully completing the course you will have:

  • a qualification which is accepted by virtually all British universities
  • a place on an appropriate university course
  • the broad skills to do well in your degree, both academically and socially.

 

The Advanced Level Foundation Advisory Board

The Kings Advanced Level Foundation is monitored by an Independent Advisory Board drawn from the higher education sector.

The Independent Advisory Board for the Advanced Level Foundation programme is a key element of the rigorous Quality Assurance regime which makes this course so exceptional.

The Board meets three times per year to:

  • ensure best practice is employed in setting and marking examinations and coursework;
  • moderate marks where required;
  • ensure the consistency of the Diploma award across all subjects and from one year to the next;
  • hear appeals, if required.

Members of the board are all distinguished educators from the university and sixth form sectors. Each has their particular areas of specialism but all have in common a dedication to excellence in education.

Carole Thomson

Carole Thomson, former examiner for UCLES and OCR, a nationally recognised awarding body for advanced level qualifications.

 

 

 

Robin Laidlaw

Robin Laidlaw, former Chief Executive of the British Accreditation Council.

 

 

 

 

Liz CarterLiz Carter, MA (Oxon) PGCE, formerly Principal of Bosworth International College, Northampton.

University of Aberdeen articulation

Second year entry to Engineering and Geology degrees

This accelerated programme is offered in partnership with the University of Aberdeen. It provides a dedicated pathway to the Second Year of a range of undergraduate degrees in the Engineering, Chemical, Geology and Business disciplines.

Progression to Second Year entry is guaranteed with a 70% pass in the Advanced Level Foundation and an IELTS score of 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in the writing section).

Advanced Level Foundation modules:

  • General Academic and Study Skills
  • Data Handling and IT
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Human Geography
  • Subsidiary: Chemistry

Leading to 2nd Year entry to Honours degree courses in:

  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Geology and Petroleum Geology
  • Geoscience
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Petroleum Engineering
  • Business

The University of Aberdeen

The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495. It has been at the centre of the European Oil and Gas industry for over 30 years. The UK Government Department of Trade and Industry has described Aberdeen's School of Engineering as "the leading UK University for technology transfer to the Oil and Gas Industry". The majority of Aberdeen engineering graduates go on to careers in the Oil and Gas industry.

What the University says about Kings

"Kings is one of the leading providers of university preparation courses for international students in the UK. The University of Aberdeen recognises that the Kings Advanced Level Foundation Year is academically stimulating and a perfect preparation to commencing undergraduate study at Aberdeen.

The University has independently inspected the programme syllabus and assessment procedures… Previous students who have moved from Kings to Aberdeen… have performed well and the University is proud to offer an advanced entry route to such high performing students."

Course structure and content

The course runs for a full academic year. 

You can start in September and finish in June, or start in January and finish in August. Both start dates will take you on to university in September.

There are three terms per year (34 weeks of tuition for September starters and 28 weeks of tuition for January starters, 650+ total tuition hours). 

Extended option
It is also possible for students with lower language levels to join an Extended Foundation programme of 5-6 terms, from IELTS 4.5.

All students need to choose a subject stream. This will depend on the type of degree you want to study at university.

The programme is highly flexible, and able to adapt to the needs and academic aspirations of each student. It does this through core modules and a series of elective modules which can be combined in different ways to create main subject streams:

  • Business
  • Engineering
  • Life Sciences and Pharmacy
  • Architecture
  • Media and Communications
  • Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Mathematics, Computing and Science

Core modules are:

  • Communication and Study Skills
  • Data Handling and Information Technology

Elective modules are:

  • Art and Design
  • Biology
  • Business Studies
  • Chemistry
  • Economics
  • Government and Politics
  • History
  • Human Geography
  • Law
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Psychology

Core modules

Communication and Study Skills (CSS)

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the CSS module, students should be able to:

  • Research information for assignments using a wide range of written and verbal sources
  • Use the Library system and IT resources
  • Refer to source material, extract relevant information and incorporate this information into a well-organised piece of work
  • Lay out work correctly, observing the conventions of essay writing
  • Demonstrate the ability to address the topic clearly, develop it in a clear and rational way and take account of the needs of the reader
  • Write/speak using the language appropriateto the particular functions required e.g. present argument, analyse data, etc.
  • Plan, formulate, organise and convey his /her own ideas clearly, coherently and succinctly in short or extended prose/speech
  • Become a critic of his/her writing/speech, evaluating his/her own performance
  • Read a range of academic texts appropriate to the level of a student embarking on undergraduate studies, adopting relevant strategies to deal with the information presented
  • Gauge the relevance of a written source to his/her academic requirements
  • Have an awareness of written discourse and the impact verbal markers may have on a text
  • Listen to a range of spoken English used in lectures, presentations and seminars and adopt relevant strategies to deal with the information presented
  • Focus on the main features in a lecture and talk clear and relevant notes
  • Present ideas in a clear and logical manner in seminars and tutorials
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the phonological features of spoken English
  • Use aids such as PowerPoint to reinforce his/ her presentations

General Study Skills

  • Self-organisation: study planning; timetable planning; prioritising; categorising; filing and recording
  • Selecting sources: reading lists and bibliographies; Internet searches and key word scanning
  • Note-taking and summarising: outlining; mind-mapping; marking texts
  • Organisation of academic texts: contents, bibliography, appendices, citations, presentation, layout, graphics
  • Quoting and paraphrasing: identifying the main idea, identifying sources; distinguishing quoting from plagiarising
  • Debating, dictionary work, finding your way round a library, keeping vocabulary notebooks and learning vocabulary

Term 1:

Academic Writing and vocabulary development

  • The process of writing: organising material coherently and effectively; incorporating material from several sources; credibility of source; considering the reader’s expectations
  • Functional areas: description, clarification, narration, generalisation, argument
  • Text construction; thesis, support, argument, conclusion
  • Register
  • Developing topic specific vocabulary for academic subjects

Listening and note-taking and vocabulary/ grammar development

  • Understanding the structure and organisation of lectures and talks
  • Listening for the main idea, specific information and attitude
  • Developing the skills of prediction, summarising and filtering information
  • The character of spoken English in lectures and talks
  • Developing topic specific vocabulary for academic subjects
  • Analysing common grammatical errors

Term 2/3:

Effective Reading

  • Understanding text organisation and function
  • Understanding vocabulary from contextual clues
  • Evaluating the writer’s purpose and attitude
  • Techniques for rapid reading
  • Techniques for detailed reading

Presentation Skills

  • Strategies and techniques for presentations: planning structure, making talk-notes; using visual aids
  • Linguistic, paralinguistic and phonological devices: framing; signposting; summarising; rephrasing; pausing; articulation and voice quality
  • Teamwork; asking and answering questions.

Assessment
Assignment Tasks include a written assignment in term one and a presentation in term three.

 

Data Handling, Statistics and IT module (for Humanities students)

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Data Handling, Statistics and IT module, students should:

  • Be able to structure, store and analyse numerical and non-numerical data
  • Make good use of generic computer packages such as Excel
  • Be able to represent data using a variety of graphical forms
  • Be able to understand numerical data using standard statistical methods
  • Appreciate the application of statistics to modelling real-world situations
  • Understand notions of statistical testing
  • Understand the use of algorithms to solve real-world problems
  • Have a sophisticated understanding of data presented by others.
  • Be able to present a data set to give represent results in a chosen way

Term 1

  • Computer applications and statistics
  • Computer security and good organisation practice
  • Use of Word to produce well presented academic reports
  • Spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel)
  • Entering data and formulae
  • Useful functions, Formatting and Printing, Graphs
  • Measures of location and dispersion
  • Mean, median, mode, range, quartiles, standard deviation
  • Histograms, cumulative frequency diagrams, box and whisker plots, pie charts and stem and leaf diagrams
  • Statistical analysis
  • Use of spreadsheets to analyse data
  • Random sampling
  • Critical reading of data presented by others

Term 2

  • Developing skills with Excel (IF function, Vlookup and Form controls)
  • Systematic and stratified random sampling, cluster sampling and questionnaire writing
  • Probability Trees, Venn diagrams applied to probability
  • Concept of Algorithms applied to networks: bin-packing, minimum connector, shortest path, nearest neighbour
  • Correlation of Data
  • Product Moment and Spearman’s rank correlation
  • Regression lines
  • Critical values for correlations (one tail test), but not the formal vocabulary of hypothesis
  • Testing

Term 3

  • Critical path analysis and GANTT diagrams
  • Uniform Distribution
  • Normal Distribution
  • Study and critical evaluation of a wide range of graphs from the media and academia

 

Data Handling, Statistics and IT module (for Mathematics and Science students)

Learning outcomes

  • On successful completion of the Data Handling, Statistics and IT module, students should:
  • Be able to structure, store and analyse numerical and non-numerical data
  • Make sophisticated use of generic computer packages such as Excel
  • Be able to represent data using a variety of graphical forms
  • Be able to analyse numerical data using standard statistical methods
  • Appreciate the application of statistics to modelling real-world situations
  • Understand notions of statistical testing
  • Understand the use of algorithms to solve real-world problems
  • Have a sophisticated understanding of datapresented by others

Term 1

  • Computer applications and statistics
  • Computer security and good organisation practice
  • Use of Word to produce well presented academic reports
  • Spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel). Entering data and formulae
  • Useful functions, Formatting and Printing, Graphs
  • Measures of location and dispersion
  • Mean, median, mode, range, quartiles, standard deviation
  • Histograms, cumulative frequency diagrams, box and whisker plots, pie charts and stem and leaf diagrams
  • Statistical analysis
  • Use of spreadsheets to analyse data
  • Random sampling
  • Critical reading of data presented by others

Term 2

  • Developing skills with Excel. (IF function, Vlookup and Form controls.)
  • Stratified sampling and questionnaire writing
  • Probability Trees, Venn diagrams applied to probability
  • Concept of Algorithms applied to networks: bin-packing, minimum connector, shortest path, nearest neighbour, route inspection
  • Correlation of Data
  • Product Moment and Spearman’s rank correlation
  • Regression lines
  • Critical values for correlation (one tail test) but not the formal vocabulary of hypothesis testing

Term 3

  • Random variables
  • Discrete Distributions: Uniform and Binomial
  • Finding Expectation and Variance
  • Normal Distribution
  • Critical path analysis and GANTT diagrams

Art and Design module

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Art and Design module, students should:

  • Be able to communicate ideas in visual form
  • Be able to paint and draw in various media for different purposes
  • Recognise and be able to use the expressive potential of different materials and processes
  • Be able to make connections between their own work and that of other artists and designers, past and present, from their own and other cultures
  • Be able to use effectively the resources of museums and galleries and draw on these for ideas and inspiration
  • Be able to articulate a personal view of the subject

Course structure

Over the three terms the course is designed to enable students to follow thematic projects which build on and develop their key skills and support increasingly more autonomy in their work.

Term 1:
Natural Form Project – introducing students to key skills, key processes and recording techniques.

At the end of term 1, students will take Exam 1 which is 30% of their total grade. The exam will involve two three-hour exams to complete their final piece(s).

Term 2:
Human Figure Project – introducing students to research, documentation, reflection and presentation.

At the end of term 2, they will take the Assignment module one which is 30% of your total grade.

Term 3:
A-level questions – Students will select from a range of A-level themed questions one direction to develop into a personal outcome(s) in their choice of media.

At the end of term 3, students will take Exam 2, which is 30% of their total grade. The exam will involve two three-hour exams to complete their final piece(s).

AQA Assessment objectives

Students’ work will be assessed by the four AQA assessment objectives. Each objective is worth 25% and each project will be marked out of 100%.

AO1
Develop their ideas through sustained and focused investigations informed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analytical and critical understanding. Students should be using Mind Maps and should make an Artist Study.

AO2
Experiment with and select appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes, reviewing and refining their ideas as their work develops.

AO3
Record in visual and/or other forms ideas, observations and insights relevant to their intentions, demonstrating an ability to reflect on their work and progress.

AO4
Present a personal, informed and meaningful response demonstrating critical understanding, realising intentions and, where appropriate, making connections between visual, written, oral or other elements. Students will produce a Final Piece(s).

Sample enrichment activities

  • Regular exhibition visits
  • Weekly life drawing sessions in Oxford
  • Trips to the Ashmolean Museum/ Tate Modern/ Tate Britain/ Hayward/ Serpentine and commercial galleries such as White Cube and Hauser and Wirth/ Victoria and Albert Museum/ Design Museum/ National Portrait Gallery
  • Photography Club
  • Textiles Club
  • Fashion Club

Biology module

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Biology module, students should:

  • Have a theoretical understanding of Biology and diseases - that some diseases are caused by pathogens and others are non-infectious and may be influenced by lifestyle
  • Have an understanding of different organs and their functions in living organisms
  • Have an appreciation of how drugs are discovered and the process before they come on the market by studying how science works
  • Have an understanding of the variations and genetic diversity and its effects on the ecosystem
  • Have an understanding of recombinant DNA technology in agriculture, industry, and medicine
  • Have experience of practical Biology in a laboratory environment and conducted their own experiments
  • Be able to apply their knowledge and skills at a standard equivalent to Biology A-level

Term 1

Biology and disease
Topics covered include:

  • The role of pathogens in causing disease 
  • The role of lifestyle in causing disease
  • The digestive System
  • Proteins
  • Enzyme action
  • Enzyme properties
  • Carbohydrate digestion
  • Cells
  • Plasma membranes
  • Diffusion
  • Osmosis
  • Active transport
  • Absorption
  • Cholera
  • Lung function
  • The biological basis of lung disease
  • Heart structure and function
  • The biological basis of heart disease
  • Principles of immunology

The variety of living organisms
Topics covered include:

  • Structure of DNA
  • Genes and polypeptides 
  • DNA and chromosomes 
  • Meiosis
  • Genetic diversity

Investigative and practical skills in Biology
Topics covered include:

  • Heart Dissection - heart structure
  • Transport and movement across biological materials.

Term 2

The variety of living organisms
Topics covered include:

  • Haemoglobin
  • Carbohydrates
  • Cells
  • Replication of DNA 
  • Mitosis 
  • Cell cycle 
  • Cell differentiation 
  • Antibiotics 
  • Genetic variation in bacteria 
  • Species diversity 
  • Index of diversity 

Investigative and practical skills in Biology

  • Independent variables and measuring changes in the dependent variable
  • Processing raw data 
  • Drawing conclusions

Populations and environment
Topics covered include:

  • Populations and ecosystems 
  • Investigating populations 
  • Variation in population size 
  • Human populations 
  • ATP 
  • Aerobic respiration 
  • Anaerobic respiration 
  • Energy transfer 
  • Energy and food production 
  • Nutrient cycles 
  • Carbon 
  • Nitrogen

Term 3

Topics covered include:

  • Inheritance 
  • The Hardy-Weinberg principle 
  • Selection 
  • Speciation

Control in cells and in organisms

  • The genetic code 
  • Polypeptide synthesis 
  • Gene mutation 
  • Gene cloning and transfer 
  • Gene therapy 
  • Medical diagnosis 
  • Genetic fingerprinting

Investigative and practical skills in Biology

  • Investigating biological problems involves changing a specific factor, the independent variable, and measuring the changes in the dependent variable that result. 
  • Data should be analysed by means of an appropriate statistical test. This allows calculation of the probability of an event being due to chance. Appropriate conclusions should be drawn and scientific knowledge from the A-level specification should be used to explain these conclusions. 
  • Limitations are inherent in the material and apparatus used and procedures adopted. These limitations should be identified, evaluated and methods of overcoming them suggested.

Sample enrichment activities

  • The Big Bang fair, NEC Birmingham 
  • Natural History Museum visit 
  • Oxford University Science laboratory visit 
  • The Royal Society, London 
  • Science Club 
  • Science in the News Club

Business Studies module

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Business Studies module students should:

  • Have factual knowledge and understanding of the principles of planning a business and raising finance
  • Be able to apply knowledge and understanding to problems and issues arising from familiar and non familiar business situations
  • Understand the methods of business analysis to investigate business problems, issues and how to implement strategies for success within business environment
  • Evaluate, distinguish between and asses appropriateness of fact and opinion, and judge information from a variety of business sources

Term 1

Introduction to Business Studies
Definition, objectives, outline of the course.

Planning a Business & Raising Finance
Components include:

  • The role of entrepreneurs and defining enterprise 
  • Different business models and structures 
  • Awareness of the risks and rewards 
  • Understanding the motives for becoming an entrepreneur 
  • Analysing the support provided by the Government for enterprise and entrepreneurs 
  • Generating and protecting business ideas, and understanding the sources of business ideas 
  • Identification of product or market niche, copyright, patents and trademarks, franchises, understanding the formation and operations of a franchise, advantages and disadvantages to franchisors and franchisees 
  • Transforming Resources into Goods and Services, inputs, outputs and the nature of the transformation of resources into finished products 
  • Developing business plans, conducting market research, methods of primary and secondary research and their benefits and problems 
  • Legal structures for the business

Strategies for Success
Components include:

  • Factors influencing start-up locations and strategies 
  • Employing people, types of people used in small businesses, using consultants and advisors 
  • Financial planning and analysis 
  • Cash flow forecasting, setting budgets 
  • Human resource strategies for larger businesses, effective employee/employer relations, managing communications with employees, competitive organisational structures, 
  • Understanding operational objectives and marketing strategies for larger businesses 
  • Market analysis, market penetration, product development and market development strategies

Term 2

Managing and improving Business
Components include:

  • Using Budgets 
  • Calculation and interpretation of favourable and adverse variances 
  • Improving cash flow, measuring and increasing profit 
  • Improving organisational structure and developing an effective workforce 
  • Empowering employees, working in teams, theories of motivation

Business Operations
Components include:

  • Making operational decisions 
  • Specialisation 
  • Division of labour, methods of production, productive and allocative efficiency 
  • Lean production, critical path analysis, operational targets, calculating and managing capacity utilisation 
  • Just in time production 
  • Customer service, monitoring and improving customer service 
  • Working with suppliers, choosing effective suppliers, using suppliers to improve operational performance 
  • Types of technology in operations management, introducing and updating technology

Marketing
Components include:

  • Purpose of marketing, niche and mass marketing, marketing mix 
  • Development of new goods and services 
  • Unique selling point, product portfolio analysis, product life cycle, Boston Matrix, promotional mix pricing strategies, choosing appropriate distribution channels, determinants of competition, improving competitiveness.

Term 3

Economic Environment
Components include:

  • The Business Cycle and economic growth 
  • GDP, GNP, standard of living & quality of life 
  • Unemployment, population and labour force defined and analysis 
  • Forms of inflation and their effect on businesses 
  • The effects of international exchange rates on businesses and business decisions 
  • Analysing the effects of interest rates on businesses and business decisions 
  • Cause and effect of Globalisation and the impact emerging markets

Political Environment
Components include:

  • The relationship between business and the political environment 
  • Introduction to Government Intervention, state provision, regulation, taxes, subsidies 
  • Assessing the effects of Government intervention and policy methods on businesses 
  • Introduction to Government Economic Policies 
  • Assessing the role of European Union

Social and Technological Environment
Components include:

  • Relationships between business and the social and technological environment 
  • Business response to the changing demographic and ethnic structure of population 
  • Business response to technological change when it comes to marketing opportunities, the culture of the business and the processes and systems used within the business.

Sample enrichment activities

  • BMW factory visit 
  • Business Enterprise 
  • Bank of England visit 
  • Coca Cola factory tour

Chemistry module

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Chemistry module students should:

  • Have a theoretical understanding of chemistry and how important it is in everyday life
  • Have an understanding of how mass spectrometry is used to provide information about the existence and relative abundance of isotopes and its use in carbon dating and sports
  • Have understanding of the emissions produced in the burning of fuels and how chemists are working to minimise the impact of these on the environment
  • Have an appreciation of the importance of aromatic compounds in the fields of pharmaceutical chemicals and dyestuffs
  • Have practical skills associated with the preparation of compounds 
  • Have experience of practical chemistry in a laboratory environment and conducted their own experiments

Term 1

Foundation Chemistry
Atomic structure:

  • Fundamental particles 
  • Protons, neutrons and electrons 
  • Mass number and isotopes 
  • Electron arrangement

Amount of Substance:

  • Relative atomic mass and relative molecular mass 
  • The mole and the Avogadro constant (L) 
  • The ideal gas equation 
  • Empirical and molecular formulae 
  • Balanced equations and associated calculations

Bonding:

  • Nature of ionic, covalent and metallic bonds 
  • Bond polarity 
  • Forces acting between molecules 
  • States of matter 
  • Shapes of simple molecules and ions

Periodicity:

  • Classification of elements in s, p and d blocks 
  • Properties of the elements of Period 3 to illustrate periodic trends

Introduction to Organic Chemistry:

  • Nomenclature 
  • Isomerism

Alkanes:

  • Fractional distillation of crude oil 
  • Modification of alkanes by cracking

Chemistry in Action
Energetics:

  • Enthalpy change

Kinetics:

  • Collision theory 
  • Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution 
  • Effect of temperature on reaction rate 
  • Effect of concentration 
  • Catalysts

Redox Reactions:

  • Oxidation and reduction 
  • Oxidation states 
  • Redox equations

Group 7(17), the Halogens:

  • Trends in physical properties 
  • Trends in the oxidizing abilities of the halogens 
  • Trends in the reducing abilities of the halide ions 
  • Identification of halide ions using silver nitrate 
  • Uses of chlorine and chlorate(I)

Group 2, the Alkaline Earth Metals:

  • Trends in physical properties 
  • Trends in chemical properties

Investigative and Practical Skills in Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry:

  • Make up a volumetric solution 
  • Carry out a simple acid-base titration

Term 2

Chemistry in Action
Haloalkanes:

  • Synthesis of chloroalkanes 
  • Nucleophilic substitution 
  • Elimination

Alkenes:

  • Polymerisation of alkenes

Alcohols:

  • Nomenclature

Analytical Techniques:

  • Mass spectrometry

Investigative and Practical Skills in Chemistry
Physical Chemistry:

  • Measure an enthalpy change

Kinetics, Equilibria and Organic Chemistry Kinetics:

  • Collision theory 
  • Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution 
  • Effect of temperature on reaction rate 
  • Effect of concentration 
  • Catalysts

Acids and Bases:

  • Brønsted–Lowry acid–base equilibria in aqueous solution 
  • Definition and determination of pH 
  • The ionic product of water, Kw 
  • Weak acids and bases Ka for weak acids 
  • pH curves, titrations and indicators

Nomenclature and Isomerism in Organic Chemistry:

  • Naming organic compounds 
  • Isomerism

Amino Acids:

  • Acid and base properties 
  • Proteins

Term 3

Organic Chemistry
Polymers:

  • Addition polymers 
  • Condensation polymers 
  • Biodegradability and disposal of polymers

Structure Determination:

  • Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy 
  • Chromatography

Energetics, Redox and Inorganic Chemistry
Thermodynamics:

  • Enthalpy change (ΔH) 
  • Free-energy change (ΔG) and entropy change (ΔS)

Reactions of Inorganic Compounds in Aqueous Solution:

  • Lewis acids and bases 
  • Metal-aqua ions 
  • Acidity or hydrolysis reactions 
  • Substitution reactions

Investigative and Practical Skills in Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry:

  • Carry out a redox titration

Physical Chemistry:

  • Investigate how pH changes when a weak acid reacts with a strong base or when a strong acid reacts with a weak base.

Sample enrichment activities

  • The Big Bang fair, NEC Birmingham 
  • Science Club 
  • Astronomy Club 
  • Science in the News Club

Economics module

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Economics module, students should:

  • Have a factual knowledge of the principles of economics at micro-, macro- and international levels 
  • Understand the tools of economic analysis and the problems to which these tools may be applied 
  • Understand economics as a discipline in its own right and be aware of its links to related subjects 
  • Be familiar with common sources of economics data and accustomed to using the principal reference sources.

Term 1

Introduction to Microeconomics
Definition, objectives, outline of the course.

The Economic Problem
Topics covered:

  • Wants greater than resources, scarcity choice, opportunity cost and Production Possibility Frontier (PPF). 
  • Factors of production: land, labour capital and enterprise. 
  • Rewards: rent, wages, interest and profit. 
  • Capital goods, consumer goods, free goods and economic goods. 
  • Types of economies: the free market, command and mixed economies; and how they respond to the economic problem. 
  • Economic agents and their objectives.

The Market
Topics covered:

  • Demand and supply curves, the slope of the curves, movements and factors that influence shifts in demand and supply, income and substitution effects. 
  • Veblen and Giffen goods, long run and short run. 
  • Price determination: equilibrium prices and quantities, impact of shifts in demand and supply curves on price and quantities, disequilibrium. 
  • Elasticity: Price, income and cross elasticities of demand, price elasticity of supply, formula, meaning of the number and sign, factors that determine elasticity of demand and supply. 
  • Practical applications of price, income and cross elasticities of demand. Consumer and producer surplus.

Market Failure and Government Intervention
Topics covered:

  • Externalities 
  • Maximum and minimum prices
  • Buffer stock operations 
  • Taxes and subsidies.

Term 2

Introduction to Macroeconomics
Definition, objectives, outline of the course.

National Income Accounting: Measurements, Comparisons and Limitations
Topics covered:

  • Measurement of national income: Three methods and their limitations, problems of comparison between countries, national expenditure=national income=national output. 
  • GDP, GNP/GNI, NNP, GDP per capita, nominal and real GDP.

Poverty, Inequality and Distribution of Income
Topics covered:

  • Standard of living, quality of life, poverty, inequality and distribution of income, role of government in the redistribution of income. 
  • Lorenz curve: Gini Co-efficient

Circular Flow of Income Model, AD/AS Analysis, Consumption, Investment and Saving
Topics covered:

  • Circular Flow of Income using five sector model, withdrawals and injections. 
  • Aggregate demand: AD=C+I+G+(X-M), factors that can cause shifts in AD. 
  • Aggregate supply: short run aggregate supply and long run aggregate supply, factors that can cause shifts in short run and long run supply curves, national income equilibrium. 
  • Consumption: factors that influence consumption, marginal propensity to consume and average propensity to consume. 
  • Saving: factors that influence saving, marginal propensity to save and average propensity to save (saving ratio). 
  • Investment: planned and actual, autonomous and induced investment, gross and net investment. 
  • Multiplier and accelerator. 
  • Practical application of the theory of multiplier using AD and AS.

Macro Economic Performance: Indicators, their causes and effects
Topics covered:

  • Macro policy objectives; ways of achieving these objectives and managing conflicts. 
  • Unemployment: types, causes, effects and policies to control unemployment.

Macro Economic Performance: Indicators, their causes and effects – continuation
Topics covered:

  • Inflation: types, causes, effects and policies to control inflation, Phillips Curve. 
  • Economic cycle/business cycle/trade cycle: Boom, recession, depression and recovery.
  • Balance of payments: capital, current and financial accounts. 
  • Exchange rate: fixed and floating (advantages and disadvantages). 
  • Exchange rate determination. 
  • Economic growth: advantages and disadvantages, positive and negative output gaps. 
  • The Budget: deficit, surplus and balance.

Term 3

Macro Economic Policies and their Impact on Macro economy
Topics covered:

  • Demand Side Policies: instruments, objectives, effects and limitations. 
  • Fiscal Policy: automatic and discretionary stabilisers. 
  • Monetary Policy: instruments, objectives, effects and limitations. 
  • Supply Side Policies: objectives, effects and limitations.

Theory of the Firm
Topics covered:

  • Costs: fixed, variable, average, marginal and total costs, short run cost curves and long run cost curves: Law of Diminishing Returns, economies, diseconomies of scale and returns to scale. 
  • Revenue: marginal, average and total revenue. Normal, abnormal and subnormal profits, the principle of profit maximisation MC=MR. 
  • Other objectives of firms other than profit maximisation; sales and revenue maximisation.

Market Structures
Topics covered:

  • Perfect competition: features, price and output determination in short run and long run, desirability of perfect competition, efficiency: productive, allocative and dynamic efficiency. 
  • Monopoly: features, price and output determination in short run and long run, types of barriers to entry, natural monopoly, arguments for and against monopoly, price discrimination. 
  • Monopolistic competition: features, price and output determination in short run and long run. 
  • Oligopoly: features and a brief introduction on the kinked demand curve. 
  • Contestable Markets: features, examples and case studies.

International Economics
Topics covered:

  • International trade: absolute and comparative advantage theories 
  • Free trade vs. Protectionism (advantages and disadvantages). 
  • Globalisation and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI).

Sample enrichment activities

  • BMW factory visit 
  • Business Enterprise 
  • Bank of England visit 
  • Coca Cola factory tour

Government and Politics module

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the course students should:

  • Understand the relationships between institutions and issues in the UK and US systems 
  • Be familiar with the framework of the British and US political system and its institutions 
  • Have a sound understanding of the rule of law and its role in society 
  • Have a sound understanding of the sources of UK and US law 
  • Be able to draw comparisons between the American and British systems of government

Term 1

UK Democracy and Representation
Defining democracy - what is democracy?

  • Types of democracy: direct, representative and liberal democracy. 
  • Features of UK democracy - democratic elections; role of Parliament and pressure groups (pluralism). 
  • The concept of rights and individual freedoms.

Elections in the UK

  • Features of the simple plurality system and advantages of this system (strong government, constituency representation and electoral choice) and disadvantages (unfairness, wasted votes, unaccountable government). 
  • An awareness of proportional systems used in the UK.

Political parties

  • Functions of political parties; main ideas of the Conservative and Labour Party 
  • 1980-2006 (Thatcherism – neoliberalism and social Thatcherism; Blairism and New Labour market economics, constitutional reform).

Pressure groups

  • The role and functions of pressure groups; types of pressure groups: sectional, cause, insider and outsider groups 
  • The rePressure groups and democracy. 
  • Pluralism.

UK Government

  • The constitution the function, nature and effectiveness of the UK constitution. 
  • Parliament - the House of Commons, the legislative process, scrutiny and accountability the role and inter-relationships between Parliament, (focus on the House of Commons).

Term 2

UK Government

  • The Executive - the role of the Prime Minister; prime ministerial power: (power of patronage, party and cabinet leadership; access to the media) constraints (the Cabinet, the party, public opinion, the media); leadership styles of recent PMs – Thatcher, Major, Blair, Brown. 
  • The role and functions of cabinet; collective and individual ministerial responsibility; theories of executive power.

Governing the USA

  • A critical examination of the institutional framework of US government and the interrelationships between its legislative, executive and judicial processes. 
  • Comparisons will be made with the UK political system. 
  • US Constitution - origins of the constitution, the nature and principles of the US Constitution including a conceptual understanding of the separation of powers; checks and balances and constitutional rights; comparisons with the UK’s uncodified constitution and unitary system. 
  • Congress - composition, powers and legislative process; differences between the House and the Senate; comparisons with the Westminster Parliament.

Term 3

The Presidency

  • Formal and informal powers of the president; institutional and political constraints on presidential power; the main determinants of presidential and congressional relations; presidential and prime ministerial systems compared.

The Supreme Court

  • The role and composition of the Supreme Court including the appointment and confirmation process; the power of judicial review exemplified by landmark cases; the protection of rights and liberties.

Liberalism in the US

  • Liberal democracy, constitutionalism, the primacy of the individual, modern liberalism and FDR; neo-liberalism – Reaganomics; neo-conservatism and Bush.

Sample enrichment activities

  • Houses of Parliament trip 
  • Bletchley Park visit 
  • Victoria and Albert Museum 
  • Current Affairs and News Club 
  • History Film Club 
  • Trinity Arts awards 
  • Debating Society

History module

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the History module students should:

  • Be aware of some of the major trends and events which have shaped the UK, Europe and the World in the last two centuries
  • Have considered the impact of new ideas on the development of the whole world
  • Have studied the revolutionary development of thought, industry and politics
  • Be aware of the dramatic events facing the world in the 20th century
  • Appreciate the growing issues relating to developing superpowers and their relationships with each other
  • Have developed the skills required to be able to understand, analyse and evaluate the evidence for human actions

Term 1

The French Revolution

  • The Ancien Regime 
  • The Causes of the Revolution 
  • Developments 1789-93 
  • Developments 1793-1799 
  • Internal and external opposition to the Revolution. 
  • Effects on Europe 
  • Bonaparte

The Industrial Revolution

  • Preconditions and Causes in UK, France, Germany 
  • The spread of industrialisation – In UK, France, Germany 
  • Impact of industrial revolution in UK, France, Germany

Term 2

The Russian Revolution:

  • The background to 1905. Marxism and Leninism 
  • 1905 Revolution and its impact 
  • The causes of the Russian Revolution 
  • The events of 1915-17 
  • The establishment of Bolshevik rule and its impact 
  • Conditions for rise of totalitarianism

Europe of the Dictators

  • The impact of ideology on the theory and practice of Leadership and the cult of personality 
  • Mussolini: The ideology of fascism; Mussolini’s rise to power; The Fascist dictatorship; The conduct of Italian foreign policy 1919-39 
  • Hitler: The ideology of Nazism; Hitler’s rise to power; The Nazi dictatorship; The conduct of German foreign policy 1919-39 
  • Stalin: The ideology of Stalinism; Stalin’s rise to power; The Stalinist dictatorship; The conduct of Russian foreign policy 1919-39

Term 3

The Cold War after World War II

  • The causes of the Cold War to 1947 
  • The USA and the Problems of Europe 
  • The policies of the USSR towards Western and Eastern Europe; Challenges to the USSR’s Control in Eastern Europe 
  • US policies and containment 
  • The Historical debate on the Origins of the Cold War 
  • The Crisis of Communism and the end of the Cold War

Sample enrichment activities

  • History Film Club 
  • Visit to Hampton Court Palace 
  • Houses of Parliament trip 
  • Bletchley Park visit 
  • Victoria and Albert Museum 
  • Trinity Arts awards

Human Geography module

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the course, students should:

  • Be aware of the main elements in the global distribution of people, industries and wealth and understand how social, economic, historical and environmental factors interact to influence these 
  • Be able to explain the processes involved in the development of a country’s industry, transport, population structure and economy 
  • Have in-depth knowledge of the local effects of global processes, the impacts of government policy and the extent to which nations are interdependent 
  • Appreciate the role of models in the study of human geography and be able to apply abstract theories to real life case studies 
  • Be able to use a range of skills and techniques, including the use of maps and images at different scales.

Term 1

Population
Topics covered:

  • The global distribution of the world’s population. 
  • The positive and negative factors which can influence the density of population in a given area at a range of scales. 
  • The world’s population and the population explosion as recorded by the world population clock. 
  • The factors which affect population change [IMR, FR, BR, DR and NI]. Changing birth/ death rates and other demographic indicators. Database sampling and statistical methods of analysis. 
  • The Demographic Transition Model. 
  • Overpopulation and the theories of Malthus and Boserup. Access to water supplies or other natural resources. 
  • Global and regional variations in population structure. Recording population change using population pyramids Variations between MEDC’s and LEDC’s. Dependency ratios, ageing and youthful population structures and their implications for governments. Political and economic impacts of changing population structures. 
  • Managing population change. Policies designed to restrict or increase growth. 
  • The impact of population growth on the environment. 
  • Migration and its causes. The classification of migration. Migration models. Case studies to investigate the different types e.g. forced, voluntary, internal, and international. The impacts of migration on the source area/ country and the host area/country. 
  • Population structure and changing patterns of migration within the UK. 
  • Urban models. 
  • Counter-urbanisation and conflicts within the rural-urban fringe. Inner city decay and regeneration. 
  • Growth of the local urban area with emphasis on the residential land use and change over time and space. 
  • Mapwork skills.

Term 2

Urban change and Development
Topics covered:

  • Contrasting structures and contrasts in urbanisation between MEDC’s and LEDC’s. 
  • The causes and consequences of rapid urbanisation in LEDC’s: possible solutions to the problems. 
  • Defining development. Indicators used in the identification of the different levels of development. Problems associated with measuring and defining levels of development. 
  • How to use a range of data bases to extract, present and analyse data on development. 
  • Identifying and explaining reasons for global development disparities. 
  • An analysis of trade and current global economic activity and the application/ relevance in today’s world of a range of economic development models. (Rostow, Friedman, Clark, Myrdal). 
  • Issues of globalisation. 
  • Developments in global communications and transport. Comparative advantages of air, sea, road and rail transport.

Term 3

Development and Industrial Change
Topics covered:

  • Aid and the role of Government and Non-Government Organisations. (NGOs). 
  • Sustainable development issues. 
  • The changing nature and structure of economic activity within the UK. The growth and decline of manufacturing industries in the UK. De-industrialisation and the nature and location of present-day manufacturing in the UK. Regional disparities. Regional policies and regeneration, including an evaluation of their success or failure. 
  • Case studies of modern industries to include the M4 corridor and Business or Science Parks. 
  • The growth of the service sector. The changing nature and structure of the retail sector. 
  • The employment structure of the local urban area to include the commercial, manufacturing and service sectors. 
  • Industries in the Rapidly Industrialising Countries. (RIC’s) and the evolving interdependence of nations. The emergence of new economic ‘super-power’ countries e.g. China, Russia, Brazil or India. Case studies of global shifts in the car industry and/or the fashion industry. 
  • The tourist industry. The impact of commercial tourism at a range of scales from local to national. The growth of ‘Eco Tourism’.

Sample enrichment activities

  • Dorset Coast field trip 
  • Bletchley Park visit 
  • Current Affairs and News Club 
  • History film Club 
  • Trinity Arts awards 
  • Debating Society

Maths module

Content for Term 1

Basic Algebra and Quadratic Functions [C1]
Simplifying Expressions; Factorising Quadratics; Laws of Indices; Surds; Rationalising Denominators; Completing the Square; Formula for Solving a Quadratic; Sketching Quadratics.

Equations and Inequalities [C1]
Simultaneous Linear Equations/Inequalities, Simultaneous Quadratic and Linear Equations/Inequalities.

Coordinate Geometry [C1]
Equation of a Straight Line; Gradient; Parallel/ Perpendicular.

Curve Sketching [C1]
Quadratic functions, Cubic functions and Reciprocal functions; Graph Intersections; Transformations f(x ± a), f(x) ± a, f(ax), af(x).

Sequences and Series [C1]
Definition by Recurrence Relationship; APs; Sum of an AP; Sigma Notation.

Differentiation [C1]
Meaning of Derivative; Differentiating Powers of x; Second Order Derivatives; Rate of Change at a Point; Tangents and Normals.

Integration [C1]
As the Reverse Process of Differentiation; Integral Sign; Finding Constant of Integration.

More Algebra and Functions [C2]
Dividing a Polynomial by x ± p; Factor and Remainder Theorems.

Sine and Cosine Rules [C2]
Using the Sine Rule and Cosine Rule to find sides and angles of triangles. Application of the Sine and Cosine Rules and Pythagoras’ Theorem in problem solving; Area of a Triangle using the Sine Formula

Exponentials and Logarithms [C2]
Laws of Logs; Logs to Base 10; Solving ax = b; Change of Base Rule.

Coordinate Geometry in the x-y plane [C2]
The Mid-Point of a line segment; Distance Between Two Points; Equation of a Circle.

Content for Term 2

Binomial Theorem [C2]
Pascal’s Triangle; Combinations and Factorial Notation; Expanding (a+bx)n.

Radian Measure [C2]
Circles; Arc Length; Area of Sector and Segment.

Geometric Sequences and Series [C2]
The nth term; Solving problems involving Growth and Decay; The Sum of a GP; Sum to Infinity for Convergent Geometric Series.

Graphs of Trigonometric Functions [C2]
Graphs of Sin, Cos, Tan; Exact Values of Sin, Cos, Tan 30, 45 degrees, etc.

Further Differentiation
Increasing and Decreasing Functions; Stationary Points; Max, Min and Points Of Inflection.

Trigonometric Identities/Equations [C2]
Solving trig equations; Sin/Cos/Tan (nx + c) = k; Quadratic Trig Equations.

Further Integration [C2]
Definite Integration; Area under a Curve; Area Between Straight Line and a Curve.

Algebraic Fractions [C3]
Simplifying and Manipulating Expressions with Algebraic Fractions.

Functions [C3]
Function Notation: Range; Mapping Diagrams; Graphs; Composite Functions; Inverse Functions.

Exponential and Log Functions [C3]
Exponential and Log Function; ax , ex, ln x.

Trigonometry [C3]
Sec, Cosec, Cot and their Graphs; Use in Simple Identities.

Content for Term 3

Further Trigonometric Identities [C3]
Addition Formulae; Double Angle Formulae and Half Angle Formulae.

Differentiation [C3]
Chain Rule; Product Rule; Quotient Rule; Differentiating ex, ln x, and Trig Functions.

Partial Fractions [C4]
Up to 3 Linear Factors; Repeated Linear Factors; Improper.

The Binomial Theorem [C4]
The Binomial Theorem and its application including use with Partial Fractions.

Differentiation [C4]
Implicit Functions; The Power Function (y = ax); Connecting Rates of Change; Setting up Differential Equations.

Further Integration [C4]
Use with Partial Fractions; Trig Identities; Integration by Substitution; Integration by Parts.

Sample enrichment activities

  • Bletchley Park visit 
  • The Big Bang fair, NEC Birmingham
  • UK Maths Challenge 
  • Science Club 
  • Astronomy Club 
  • Science in the News Club

Physics module

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Physics module students should:

  • Have an appreciation of the physical laws which govern the universe
  • Have an understanding of principles of Physics ready for further studies of physics in Higher Education
  • Have experience of practical physics in a laboratory environment and conducted their own experiments
  • Be able to apply their knowledge and skills at a standard equivalent to Physics A-level

Term 1

Introduction to Physics

  • Fair tests 
  • Order of magnitudes, accuracy, precision 
  • Units and symbols.

Electricity

  • Current and Charge 
  • DC currents 
  • Ohm’s law 
  • Kirchhoff’s Laws 
  • Resistivity 
  • Series and Parallel 
  • Power and energy 
  • EMF and internal resistance 
  • Potentiometers 
  • LDR, filament lamps, diodes 
  • (V-I graphs) 
  • AC currents and CRO

Electrons and Photons

  • EM radiation 
  • Atomic Structure 
  • Photoelectric Effect 
  • The electron volt 
  • Ionisation and excitation

Mechanics

  • Vectors and Scalars 
  • Motion in a straight line 
  • Newton’s Three Laws 
  • Projectiles 
  • Work, Energy and Power 
  • Conservation of Energy 
  • Moments 
  • Principle of Moments

Bulk Properties of Materials

  • Density (use of vernier, balance etc) 
  • Hooke’s Law 
  • Stress, strain 
  • Young’s Modulus and Energy 
  • Materials Vocabulary

Term 2

Waves Introduction

  • Media and Vocabulary 
  • Transverse and Longitudinal 
  • Polarisation 
  • Reflection and refraction 
  • “Snell’s Law” 
  • Total Internal Reflection 
  • Superposition 
  • Stationary Waves 
  • Interference 
  • Path Difference 
  • Coherence 
  • Double Slit 
  • Diffraction Grating

Further Mechanics

  • Momentum and force 
  • Conservation of momentum 
  • Elastic and inelastic collisions 
  • Circular motion 
  • Simple harmonic motion 
  • Relation to circular motion 
  • Resonance 
  • Free and forced vibration

Gravitation

  • Gravitational fields 
  • Newton’s Law 
  • Field strength 
  • Orbits of planets and satellites

Term 3

Electric Fields

  • Coulomb’s law 
  • Field strength 
  • Analogy with gravitational fields

Capacitance

  • Capacitors 
  • Q = CV 
  • Energy stored 
  • Parallel plate capacitors 
  • Charging and discharging 
  • Time constant

Magnetic Fields

  • Flux density, tesla 
  • Force on wire F = BIL 
  • Left hand rule 
  • Force on charged particle F = Bqv 
  • Electromagnetic induction (qualitative) 
  • Transformers, motors and dynamos

Nuclear Physics

  • Particles and radiation 
  • Radioactivity 
  • Inverse square law 
  • Radioactive decay 
  • Carbon dating 
  • Nuclear reactor (qualitative treatment)

Thermal Physics

  • Thermal energy 
  • Specific and latent heat

Sample enrichment activities

  • Bletchley Park visit 
  • The Big Bang fair, NEC Birmingham 
  • Science Club 
  • Astronomy Club 
  • Science in the News Club 
  • The Royal Society, London 
  • Google Science Fair

From Kings Life

Kings Bournemouth Biology students on their study field trip

Biology students at Kings Bournemouth recently enjoyed a three-day trip to Leeson House, Swanage, where they discovered the fauna and flora of the numerous ecosystems of the British coast.

Read the full blog post

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